Volume 2, Issue 1, February 2014, Page: 27-35
Evaluation of the Combustion Characteristics of Railroad Waste using a Cone Calorimeter
Duckshin Park, Eco-Transport Research Division, Korea Railroad Research Institute, 176 Railroad museum-ro Uiwang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 437-757, Korea
Received: Dec. 29, 2013;       Published: Feb. 20, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijema.20140201.13      View  2871      Downloads  156
Abstract
For this study, we categorized waste from railroad operation into seven types; i.e., wood, vinyl, fiber, Styrofoam, food, paper and plastic. We then performed a combustion test using a cone calorimeter that is used widely for evaluating the combustion properties of combustible materials, to evaluate the heat release rate, smoke production rate, carbon monoxide production, carbon dioxide production and mass loss rate during biomass combustion.
Keywords
Railroad Waste, Cone Calorimeter, Combustion, CO2, Heat Release
To cite this article
Duckshin Park, Evaluation of the Combustion Characteristics of Railroad Waste using a Cone Calorimeter, International Journal of Environmental Monitoring and Analysis. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2014, pp. 27-35. doi: 10.11648/j.ijema.20140201.13
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